Pragmatic and empathetic.
Academic and spiritual.
Strong and weak.
A mother and a kid at heart.

Like you,

a paradox

Like you,

a paradox

Our truth is our contribution

Sharing it is a responsibility.

I long hid parts of my life from the world, because I felt they were irrelevant to anyone else. Besides, there’s always shame in sharing the parts we don’t like…

Then I realized that ultimately our lives are all the same. We each struggle with our own fears and self-doubt. We’ve all got mental stories that don’t always serve us well.

And if sharing my journey can inspire you to honor your struggles and live this one precious life to it’s fullest, I need to do so.

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I had a beautiful childhood. My father was a diplomat. I travelled the world, and got to meet and dine with top dignitaries. You would think I’d become the most confident person in the world.

Instead, I got an eating disorder. For most of my adolescence, I crawled my way to starvation and almost to death. I’ll forever be grateful to everyone who helped me come out of it at a time when few people ever did.

But as life went on, I realized that even though I’d overcome my fear of eating and weight gain, I was still a prisoner to the voice in my head. Perfection, pleasing, control, comparison ran my life, and I could never meet my own standards. Success at work meant failure as a mom. There was no way I could win.

I began to wonder whether I’d battled my greatest fear for this.

There had to be more to life than burnout.

That’s when I decided to do a double master’s degree in Positive psychology (the science of a meaningful life), and Coaching psychology (the science of an optimal life). As you would guess, my post-graduate research was on women’s confidence, because I knew I wasn’t alone in my struggles.

What would it take for us as women to win at work, live with joy and make the difference we each want to make?

You can read my research on Fragile and Grounded Confidence. Or take my free quiz to see which kind of confidence you have.

That’s when I decided to do a double master’s degree in Positive psychology (the science of a meaningful life), and Coaching psychology (the science of an optimal life). As you would guess, my post-graduate research was on women’s confidence, because I knew I wasn’t alone in my struggles.

What would it take for us as women to win at work, live with joy and make the difference we each want to make?

You can read my research on Fragile and Grounded Confidence. Or take my free quiz to see which kind of confidence you have.

That’s when I decided to do a double master’s degree in Positive psychology (the science of a meaningful life), and Coaching psychology (the science of an optimal life). As you would guess, my post-graduate research was on women’s confidence, because I knew I wasn’t alone in my struggles.

What would it take for us as women to win at work, live with joy and make the difference we each want to make?

You can read my research on Fragile and Grounded Confidence. Or take my free quiz to see which kind of confidence you have.

Here’s what I found:

By owning who we. are, we can remove our masks and become who we’re. born to be

For years, women have been twisting themselves like a pretzel to become someone else’s expectations of them. They’ve rejected parts of themselves others don’t like, or society doesn’t value, and ended up feeling inauthentic and unfulfilled.

Maybe you’ve already felt the need to stop doing so. Maybe you’re part of the collective longing to step out of the shadows, to stop leading from a place of push and hustle, and to connect to a purpose that feels whole hearted and soulful. 

If so, there’s no better time than right now to listen to it. The current norms and structures are not working.

We’ve been working too long, and too hard, only to end up feeling frustrated, guilty, and unhappy with ourselves.  

It needn’t be so. It shouldn’t be so. The world needs us to embrace the paradoxical riches our lives embody, so we value a different kind of power in people. One that’s based on the traits and qualities that come naturally to women. 

I’m here to help you.

Not because I have it all figured out. Knowing the right answers is nowhere the same as the messy journey to living it. I make mistakes. I fail and get stuck. But I stay committed to learning and sharing it with you so I help you embrace YOUR messy journey. If you aren’t already on my list, enter your name and email, so you don’t miss the weekly resources and reflections I send to my wonderful tribe of conscientious women committed to their becoming.

I honor you, I’m grateful for your presence, and really excited for our journey together!

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The Official Story

Homaira Kabir is a coach, speaker, writer, and leadership development trainer whose expertise lies in helping women rise to their highest potential in a way that feels energizing and purposeful to them.

She is the founder of Her Becoming, an enterprise dedicated to women’s empowerment, and leadership in all areas of their lives toward positive change in their relationships, work and indeed the world.

She has an innate ability to inspire and connect to the wider perspective, while addressing some of the most real and everyday challenges of life. Long before the 2020 turmoil, she has been advocating against the rhetoric and expectations that distance women from their truth, and lead to smaller and unfulfilled lives.

She has a double Master’s degree in Positive Psychology and Coaching Psychology, and has done extensive postgraduate research on woman’s confidence and flourishing. Her research backed and evidence-based framework has been tested in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with hundreds of women around the world with positive and lasting change to their joy and success at work and in life.

Homaira blends science, spirit and experience to connect head and heart in the journey to change. Her work is widely published in Forbes, Happify, ThriveGlobal, the Huffington Post, Positive Psychology News Daily and more. And thousands of women on her newsletter list call her “inspirational”, “a beacon of hope”, and “a ray of sunshine light in dark times”.